Lut Desert was inscribed on the World Heritage as Iran’s 21st item in the list. The inscription came a couple of days after the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) registered eleven Iranian qanats on the World Heritage List in its July 15 session.

Lut Desert
in southeast of Iran and seven more historic sites have been registered on the List of World Heritage, according to a statement by the international body.
Lut Desert was inscribed on the World Heritage as Iran’s 21st item in the list. The inscription came a couple of days after the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) registered eleven Iranian qanats on the World Heritage List in its July 15 session.
Inscription of Lut Desert is significant, because it is Iran’s first-ever natural heritage site on the coveted list.
Lut Desert is a large salt desert in the provinces of Kerman and Sistan and Baluchestan, and is the world's 25th largest desert. The surface of the sand there has been measured at temperatures as high as 70 °C (159 °F), and it is one of the world's driest and hottest places.

Lut Desert and its universal records
The big desert of Lut with the area of 5,400 square kilometers is situated in the eastern region of Iran. It is part of the northern of the two deserts belts which encircle the Earth. The Sun heats these two belts of land more than any other part of Earth and creates deserts.
There are reports that no living creature can survive for long in this region, with Lut generally considered an abiotic zone, being so forbidding that not even bacteria can live. The very beautiful and typical phenomena abound in this desert. Lut desert has a few universally unique specifications. Due to its vastness only a part of this area (in the vicinity of the historical city of Shahdad), that includes the most of its phenomena is taken in to consideration.
The Lut Desert consists of several large basins separated by worn mountains and ridges, covering an area of about 200 by 100 miles, with the western part containing wind-swept corridors separating high ridges. The east is a sea of sand, described by Alfons Gabriel, one of the first explorers, in 1938, as “a confused mass of impassable tangled dunes.” Winds pile the sand into dunes up to 500 feet high, as tall as Washington's monument and Lut desert has the biggest nebkas in the world.